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ROLI's Pliable Seaboard Keyboard Allows You to Directly Interact With Music

ROLI's Pliable Seaboard Keyboard Allows You to Directly Interact With Music


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Experimental musicians take note! ROLI's Seaboard takes the standard piano and reimagines it into a soft, pliable surface allowing for direct manipulation of sound. With polyphonic pitch bend, vibrato and per-note dynamic changes, the instrument intends on changing how you make music by combining the traditional with technological advancements.

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Thanks to the rubber-like surface, you are able to rub your finger across the board to alter the sound of a note, modulating the pitch, volume and timbre. Since it's tactile, you're able to actually physically connect with the music in completely new ways. Sliding your finger side to side will alter the pitch, while moving it up and down will change the volume and timbre. Running along the top and bottom of the "keyboard" are glissando ribbons, which makes it easy to "start playing one keywave, then slide to any other keywave you choose in one fluid gesture, even allowing multiple notes to glissando independently at the same time."

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Handcrafted in London, the instrument has an onboard audio engine that means you don't have to use any external audio devices to use it. All you need to do is plug in some headphones or connect it to an amplifier and play. You can also use the Seaboard to control any other software instrument, which would allow you to play them in new ways as well.

The Seaboard comes in three different versions: the Grand Studio ($1.9k), the Grand Stage ($2.9k), and the Grand Limited First Edition ($8.8k). The main differences between them is the size, with the Studio being great for desks and the Stage being a good standalone piano keyboard. The Limited Edition is the closest you can get to a real full-size piano though, with 88 keys (and only 88 units made), and is the "thinnest full-size professional keyboard instrument ever made" at 25.7mm thin.


Posts tagged Seaboard

Well, I have had the Seaboard for a month now! After the initial exploration of finding out how it worked, what its range of expression is, etc, I have now settled down to just using it. At the moment, my focus is mostly on playing it. I still have not begun crafting unique sounds for it. Sound design is usually time-consuming and right now, my time is better spent on actually playing it, and getting the necessary work done in Max for the organ console functions I’m building for the DSO.

It is a very expressive keyboard. I am getting much more even responses from it as my fingers are growing accustomed to the surface. It is now rare to get notes that stick out due to excessive velocity. My work on the DSO is typically in 2-4 parts, and rarely a solo line. The Seaboard offers the ability to use poly-pressure to accent voices in a chord, or swell held notes, etc. I still have much to learn in this regard.

It is clear that the Seaboard works as a very expressive solo instrument. Can I match Edmund Eagen’s Continuum work? Not yet, not even close. The continuum has three dimensions of real-time control, and Eagen is a master sound designer. His custom Continuum sounds are quite well done. The reality is that the Seaboard should be capable of equal expression. The missing third dimension of control can easily be supplied by a pedal input. As time progresses and these get into more musicians hands, I’m sure we will see increasingly expressive work come out. For myself, the musicality of Eagen’s work is a target for what I get out of the Seaboard.

I think that the primary benefit of the Seaboard as an alternate controller is in the familiar tonal spacing and organization of the keyboard. For pure solo expression, I suspect a Continuum is more direct, and the half-size version is more than adequate for soloing. As tempo increases, per-note expressiveness decreases – one’s finger is just not in contact with the surface as much. It is little wonder than many of the demonstrations of these controllers feature slower tempos where one can really “work” the notes. Those are the kinds of pieces that show the unique capabilities of these instruments.

So, after a month, I am mostly in playing mode. First comes the playing, then maximizing expressiveness, then application to musical context. This will continue to be a rewarding journey.


Posts tagged Seaboard

Well, I have had the Seaboard for a month now! After the initial exploration of finding out how it worked, what its range of expression is, etc, I have now settled down to just using it. At the moment, my focus is mostly on playing it. I still have not begun crafting unique sounds for it. Sound design is usually time-consuming and right now, my time is better spent on actually playing it, and getting the necessary work done in Max for the organ console functions I’m building for the DSO.

It is a very expressive keyboard. I am getting much more even responses from it as my fingers are growing accustomed to the surface. It is now rare to get notes that stick out due to excessive velocity. My work on the DSO is typically in 2-4 parts, and rarely a solo line. The Seaboard offers the ability to use poly-pressure to accent voices in a chord, or swell held notes, etc. I still have much to learn in this regard.

It is clear that the Seaboard works as a very expressive solo instrument. Can I match Edmund Eagen’s Continuum work? Not yet, not even close. The continuum has three dimensions of real-time control, and Eagen is a master sound designer. His custom Continuum sounds are quite well done. The reality is that the Seaboard should be capable of equal expression. The missing third dimension of control can easily be supplied by a pedal input. As time progresses and these get into more musicians hands, I’m sure we will see increasingly expressive work come out. For myself, the musicality of Eagen’s work is a target for what I get out of the Seaboard.

I think that the primary benefit of the Seaboard as an alternate controller is in the familiar tonal spacing and organization of the keyboard. For pure solo expression, I suspect a Continuum is more direct, and the half-size version is more than adequate for soloing. As tempo increases, per-note expressiveness decreases – one’s finger is just not in contact with the surface as much. It is little wonder than many of the demonstrations of these controllers feature slower tempos where one can really “work” the notes. Those are the kinds of pieces that show the unique capabilities of these instruments.

So, after a month, I am mostly in playing mode. First comes the playing, then maximizing expressiveness, then application to musical context. This will continue to be a rewarding journey.


Posts tagged Seaboard

Well, I have had the Seaboard for a month now! After the initial exploration of finding out how it worked, what its range of expression is, etc, I have now settled down to just using it. At the moment, my focus is mostly on playing it. I still have not begun crafting unique sounds for it. Sound design is usually time-consuming and right now, my time is better spent on actually playing it, and getting the necessary work done in Max for the organ console functions I’m building for the DSO.

It is a very expressive keyboard. I am getting much more even responses from it as my fingers are growing accustomed to the surface. It is now rare to get notes that stick out due to excessive velocity. My work on the DSO is typically in 2-4 parts, and rarely a solo line. The Seaboard offers the ability to use poly-pressure to accent voices in a chord, or swell held notes, etc. I still have much to learn in this regard.

It is clear that the Seaboard works as a very expressive solo instrument. Can I match Edmund Eagen’s Continuum work? Not yet, not even close. The continuum has three dimensions of real-time control, and Eagen is a master sound designer. His custom Continuum sounds are quite well done. The reality is that the Seaboard should be capable of equal expression. The missing third dimension of control can easily be supplied by a pedal input. As time progresses and these get into more musicians hands, I’m sure we will see increasingly expressive work come out. For myself, the musicality of Eagen’s work is a target for what I get out of the Seaboard.

I think that the primary benefit of the Seaboard as an alternate controller is in the familiar tonal spacing and organization of the keyboard. For pure solo expression, I suspect a Continuum is more direct, and the half-size version is more than adequate for soloing. As tempo increases, per-note expressiveness decreases – one’s finger is just not in contact with the surface as much. It is little wonder than many of the demonstrations of these controllers feature slower tempos where one can really “work” the notes. Those are the kinds of pieces that show the unique capabilities of these instruments.

So, after a month, I am mostly in playing mode. First comes the playing, then maximizing expressiveness, then application to musical context. This will continue to be a rewarding journey.


Posts tagged Seaboard

Well, I have had the Seaboard for a month now! After the initial exploration of finding out how it worked, what its range of expression is, etc, I have now settled down to just using it. At the moment, my focus is mostly on playing it. I still have not begun crafting unique sounds for it. Sound design is usually time-consuming and right now, my time is better spent on actually playing it, and getting the necessary work done in Max for the organ console functions I’m building for the DSO.

It is a very expressive keyboard. I am getting much more even responses from it as my fingers are growing accustomed to the surface. It is now rare to get notes that stick out due to excessive velocity. My work on the DSO is typically in 2-4 parts, and rarely a solo line. The Seaboard offers the ability to use poly-pressure to accent voices in a chord, or swell held notes, etc. I still have much to learn in this regard.

It is clear that the Seaboard works as a very expressive solo instrument. Can I match Edmund Eagen’s Continuum work? Not yet, not even close. The continuum has three dimensions of real-time control, and Eagen is a master sound designer. His custom Continuum sounds are quite well done. The reality is that the Seaboard should be capable of equal expression. The missing third dimension of control can easily be supplied by a pedal input. As time progresses and these get into more musicians hands, I’m sure we will see increasingly expressive work come out. For myself, the musicality of Eagen’s work is a target for what I get out of the Seaboard.

I think that the primary benefit of the Seaboard as an alternate controller is in the familiar tonal spacing and organization of the keyboard. For pure solo expression, I suspect a Continuum is more direct, and the half-size version is more than adequate for soloing. As tempo increases, per-note expressiveness decreases – one’s finger is just not in contact with the surface as much. It is little wonder than many of the demonstrations of these controllers feature slower tempos where one can really “work” the notes. Those are the kinds of pieces that show the unique capabilities of these instruments.

So, after a month, I am mostly in playing mode. First comes the playing, then maximizing expressiveness, then application to musical context. This will continue to be a rewarding journey.


Posts tagged Seaboard

Well, I have had the Seaboard for a month now! After the initial exploration of finding out how it worked, what its range of expression is, etc, I have now settled down to just using it. At the moment, my focus is mostly on playing it. I still have not begun crafting unique sounds for it. Sound design is usually time-consuming and right now, my time is better spent on actually playing it, and getting the necessary work done in Max for the organ console functions I’m building for the DSO.

It is a very expressive keyboard. I am getting much more even responses from it as my fingers are growing accustomed to the surface. It is now rare to get notes that stick out due to excessive velocity. My work on the DSO is typically in 2-4 parts, and rarely a solo line. The Seaboard offers the ability to use poly-pressure to accent voices in a chord, or swell held notes, etc. I still have much to learn in this regard.

It is clear that the Seaboard works as a very expressive solo instrument. Can I match Edmund Eagen’s Continuum work? Not yet, not even close. The continuum has three dimensions of real-time control, and Eagen is a master sound designer. His custom Continuum sounds are quite well done. The reality is that the Seaboard should be capable of equal expression. The missing third dimension of control can easily be supplied by a pedal input. As time progresses and these get into more musicians hands, I’m sure we will see increasingly expressive work come out. For myself, the musicality of Eagen’s work is a target for what I get out of the Seaboard.

I think that the primary benefit of the Seaboard as an alternate controller is in the familiar tonal spacing and organization of the keyboard. For pure solo expression, I suspect a Continuum is more direct, and the half-size version is more than adequate for soloing. As tempo increases, per-note expressiveness decreases – one’s finger is just not in contact with the surface as much. It is little wonder than many of the demonstrations of these controllers feature slower tempos where one can really “work” the notes. Those are the kinds of pieces that show the unique capabilities of these instruments.

So, after a month, I am mostly in playing mode. First comes the playing, then maximizing expressiveness, then application to musical context. This will continue to be a rewarding journey.


Posts tagged Seaboard

Well, I have had the Seaboard for a month now! After the initial exploration of finding out how it worked, what its range of expression is, etc, I have now settled down to just using it. At the moment, my focus is mostly on playing it. I still have not begun crafting unique sounds for it. Sound design is usually time-consuming and right now, my time is better spent on actually playing it, and getting the necessary work done in Max for the organ console functions I’m building for the DSO.

It is a very expressive keyboard. I am getting much more even responses from it as my fingers are growing accustomed to the surface. It is now rare to get notes that stick out due to excessive velocity. My work on the DSO is typically in 2-4 parts, and rarely a solo line. The Seaboard offers the ability to use poly-pressure to accent voices in a chord, or swell held notes, etc. I still have much to learn in this regard.

It is clear that the Seaboard works as a very expressive solo instrument. Can I match Edmund Eagen’s Continuum work? Not yet, not even close. The continuum has three dimensions of real-time control, and Eagen is a master sound designer. His custom Continuum sounds are quite well done. The reality is that the Seaboard should be capable of equal expression. The missing third dimension of control can easily be supplied by a pedal input. As time progresses and these get into more musicians hands, I’m sure we will see increasingly expressive work come out. For myself, the musicality of Eagen’s work is a target for what I get out of the Seaboard.

I think that the primary benefit of the Seaboard as an alternate controller is in the familiar tonal spacing and organization of the keyboard. For pure solo expression, I suspect a Continuum is more direct, and the half-size version is more than adequate for soloing. As tempo increases, per-note expressiveness decreases – one’s finger is just not in contact with the surface as much. It is little wonder than many of the demonstrations of these controllers feature slower tempos where one can really “work” the notes. Those are the kinds of pieces that show the unique capabilities of these instruments.

So, after a month, I am mostly in playing mode. First comes the playing, then maximizing expressiveness, then application to musical context. This will continue to be a rewarding journey.


Posts tagged Seaboard

Well, I have had the Seaboard for a month now! After the initial exploration of finding out how it worked, what its range of expression is, etc, I have now settled down to just using it. At the moment, my focus is mostly on playing it. I still have not begun crafting unique sounds for it. Sound design is usually time-consuming and right now, my time is better spent on actually playing it, and getting the necessary work done in Max for the organ console functions I’m building for the DSO.

It is a very expressive keyboard. I am getting much more even responses from it as my fingers are growing accustomed to the surface. It is now rare to get notes that stick out due to excessive velocity. My work on the DSO is typically in 2-4 parts, and rarely a solo line. The Seaboard offers the ability to use poly-pressure to accent voices in a chord, or swell held notes, etc. I still have much to learn in this regard.

It is clear that the Seaboard works as a very expressive solo instrument. Can I match Edmund Eagen’s Continuum work? Not yet, not even close. The continuum has three dimensions of real-time control, and Eagen is a master sound designer. His custom Continuum sounds are quite well done. The reality is that the Seaboard should be capable of equal expression. The missing third dimension of control can easily be supplied by a pedal input. As time progresses and these get into more musicians hands, I’m sure we will see increasingly expressive work come out. For myself, the musicality of Eagen’s work is a target for what I get out of the Seaboard.

I think that the primary benefit of the Seaboard as an alternate controller is in the familiar tonal spacing and organization of the keyboard. For pure solo expression, I suspect a Continuum is more direct, and the half-size version is more than adequate for soloing. As tempo increases, per-note expressiveness decreases – one’s finger is just not in contact with the surface as much. It is little wonder than many of the demonstrations of these controllers feature slower tempos where one can really “work” the notes. Those are the kinds of pieces that show the unique capabilities of these instruments.

So, after a month, I am mostly in playing mode. First comes the playing, then maximizing expressiveness, then application to musical context. This will continue to be a rewarding journey.


Posts tagged Seaboard

Well, I have had the Seaboard for a month now! After the initial exploration of finding out how it worked, what its range of expression is, etc, I have now settled down to just using it. At the moment, my focus is mostly on playing it. I still have not begun crafting unique sounds for it. Sound design is usually time-consuming and right now, my time is better spent on actually playing it, and getting the necessary work done in Max for the organ console functions I’m building for the DSO.

It is a very expressive keyboard. I am getting much more even responses from it as my fingers are growing accustomed to the surface. It is now rare to get notes that stick out due to excessive velocity. My work on the DSO is typically in 2-4 parts, and rarely a solo line. The Seaboard offers the ability to use poly-pressure to accent voices in a chord, or swell held notes, etc. I still have much to learn in this regard.

It is clear that the Seaboard works as a very expressive solo instrument. Can I match Edmund Eagen’s Continuum work? Not yet, not even close. The continuum has three dimensions of real-time control, and Eagen is a master sound designer. His custom Continuum sounds are quite well done. The reality is that the Seaboard should be capable of equal expression. The missing third dimension of control can easily be supplied by a pedal input. As time progresses and these get into more musicians hands, I’m sure we will see increasingly expressive work come out. For myself, the musicality of Eagen’s work is a target for what I get out of the Seaboard.

I think that the primary benefit of the Seaboard as an alternate controller is in the familiar tonal spacing and organization of the keyboard. For pure solo expression, I suspect a Continuum is more direct, and the half-size version is more than adequate for soloing. As tempo increases, per-note expressiveness decreases – one’s finger is just not in contact with the surface as much. It is little wonder than many of the demonstrations of these controllers feature slower tempos where one can really “work” the notes. Those are the kinds of pieces that show the unique capabilities of these instruments.

So, after a month, I am mostly in playing mode. First comes the playing, then maximizing expressiveness, then application to musical context. This will continue to be a rewarding journey.


Posts tagged Seaboard

Well, I have had the Seaboard for a month now! After the initial exploration of finding out how it worked, what its range of expression is, etc, I have now settled down to just using it. At the moment, my focus is mostly on playing it. I still have not begun crafting unique sounds for it. Sound design is usually time-consuming and right now, my time is better spent on actually playing it, and getting the necessary work done in Max for the organ console functions I’m building for the DSO.

It is a very expressive keyboard. I am getting much more even responses from it as my fingers are growing accustomed to the surface. It is now rare to get notes that stick out due to excessive velocity. My work on the DSO is typically in 2-4 parts, and rarely a solo line. The Seaboard offers the ability to use poly-pressure to accent voices in a chord, or swell held notes, etc. I still have much to learn in this regard.

It is clear that the Seaboard works as a very expressive solo instrument. Can I match Edmund Eagen’s Continuum work? Not yet, not even close. The continuum has three dimensions of real-time control, and Eagen is a master sound designer. His custom Continuum sounds are quite well done. The reality is that the Seaboard should be capable of equal expression. The missing third dimension of control can easily be supplied by a pedal input. As time progresses and these get into more musicians hands, I’m sure we will see increasingly expressive work come out. For myself, the musicality of Eagen’s work is a target for what I get out of the Seaboard.

I think that the primary benefit of the Seaboard as an alternate controller is in the familiar tonal spacing and organization of the keyboard. For pure solo expression, I suspect a Continuum is more direct, and the half-size version is more than adequate for soloing. As tempo increases, per-note expressiveness decreases – one’s finger is just not in contact with the surface as much. It is little wonder than many of the demonstrations of these controllers feature slower tempos where one can really “work” the notes. Those are the kinds of pieces that show the unique capabilities of these instruments.

So, after a month, I am mostly in playing mode. First comes the playing, then maximizing expressiveness, then application to musical context. This will continue to be a rewarding journey.


Posts tagged Seaboard

Well, I have had the Seaboard for a month now! After the initial exploration of finding out how it worked, what its range of expression is, etc, I have now settled down to just using it. At the moment, my focus is mostly on playing it. I still have not begun crafting unique sounds for it. Sound design is usually time-consuming and right now, my time is better spent on actually playing it, and getting the necessary work done in Max for the organ console functions I’m building for the DSO.

It is a very expressive keyboard. I am getting much more even responses from it as my fingers are growing accustomed to the surface. It is now rare to get notes that stick out due to excessive velocity. My work on the DSO is typically in 2-4 parts, and rarely a solo line. The Seaboard offers the ability to use poly-pressure to accent voices in a chord, or swell held notes, etc. I still have much to learn in this regard.

It is clear that the Seaboard works as a very expressive solo instrument. Can I match Edmund Eagen’s Continuum work? Not yet, not even close. The continuum has three dimensions of real-time control, and Eagen is a master sound designer. His custom Continuum sounds are quite well done. The reality is that the Seaboard should be capable of equal expression. The missing third dimension of control can easily be supplied by a pedal input. As time progresses and these get into more musicians hands, I’m sure we will see increasingly expressive work come out. For myself, the musicality of Eagen’s work is a target for what I get out of the Seaboard.

I think that the primary benefit of the Seaboard as an alternate controller is in the familiar tonal spacing and organization of the keyboard. For pure solo expression, I suspect a Continuum is more direct, and the half-size version is more than adequate for soloing. As tempo increases, per-note expressiveness decreases – one’s finger is just not in contact with the surface as much. It is little wonder than many of the demonstrations of these controllers feature slower tempos where one can really “work” the notes. Those are the kinds of pieces that show the unique capabilities of these instruments.

So, after a month, I am mostly in playing mode. First comes the playing, then maximizing expressiveness, then application to musical context. This will continue to be a rewarding journey.


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Comments:

  1. Culain

    Bravo, you just had a great thought

  2. Karif

    Well done, your sentence will be useful

  3. Carmichael

    very interesting. THANKS.

  4. Hackett

    Bravo, the admirable phrase and it is timely

  5. Anfeald

    Absolutely agrees with you. It is the good idea. It is ready to support you.

  6. Vokus

    Your idea is very good

  7. Corcoran

    It is a pity, that now I can not express - it is compelled to leave. But I will return - I will necessarily write that I think on this question.



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