gm.haerentanimo.net
New recipes

Bird Flu May Affect Turkey Market Come Thanksgiving

Bird Flu May Affect Turkey Market Come Thanksgiving


We are searching data for your request:

Forums and discussions:
Manuals and reference books:
Data from registers:
Wait the end of the search in all databases.
Upon completion, a link will appear to access the found materials.


The worst-ever outbreak of bird flu in the United States may drive up prices of whole turkeys

Nearly 7.8 millions turkeys died this year because of bird flu.

Following the worst-ever U.S. outbreak of the highly pathogenic avian influenza, commonly known as bird flu, supplies of whole turkeys may be limited when Thanksgiving rolls around.

Roughly 7.8 million turkeys died this year as a result of the outbreak, according to Reuters. There has also been a drop in poults (young turkey or fowl being raised for food), whose numbers are down eight percent compared to last year, according to the U.S. Department of Agriculture.

Poults who are developed in May head to slaughter between August to October, depending on whether the birds are male or female. Amanda Martin, senior analyst with Indiana-based Express Markets Inc. Analytics, said to Reuters there is a May and June deadline to place heavy tom poults to develop so they can be ready to be sold as whole birds come November.

“To see that it is down … makes me think, that's probably going to mean the big, whole birds for Thanksgiving are going to be extremely hard to come by," Martin told Reuters.

Experts don’t all agree that this outbreak will affect turkey sales, as some credit the drop in placement numbers to “bunching effects” in the production of turkeys. National Turkey Federation spokesman Keith Williams also told Reuters that most people buy frozen turkeys, and said that those consumed this upcoming November were slaughtered before the bird flu struck the upper Midwest.

Still, bird flu has already made an impact on the market. U.S companies are importing eggs from Europe for the first time in over a decade to combat rising prices of domestic eggs due to the virus. States have even declared a state of emergency due to bird flu, so seeing the virus affect turkey prices come Thanksgiving isn’t difficult to imagine.


Thanksgiving Turkey Prices Impacted By Bird Flu

MINNEAPOLIS (WCCO) — So much of the turkey talk this year has been about the bird flu.

Minnesota was one of a handful of states that saw an epidemic that wiped out millions of turkeys.

And now as we approach a holiday that showcases this popular poultry, that hit to the supply is affecting the price. But does that really matter to shoppers?

“Not really,” shopper Ann Olson said. “It’s Thanksgiving, you got to have turkey [laughs].”

Shoppers appear to be taking the change in stride as they plan their holiday meals.

“It wouldn’t affect me,” shopper Diane Hallveck said. “I might shop a couple of places [to compare prices], but I’d still have to buy a turkey.”

Dan Wellinghoff is the general manager of Hy-Vee in Oakdale. It is a grocery chain that is new to the Twin Cities.

“They may choose other things, but really turkeys sell out Thanksgiving every year and I don’t see that being any different this year,” Wellinghoff said.

He suggests buying a frozen turkey rather than a fresh one to save money.

“People like the frozen ones because they can buy them early and store them. You know, pricewise they’re a little better than the fresh,” Wellinghoff said.

Analysts say egg prices are also up by as much as 50 percent since May. Meanwhile, pork production is way up this year, sending ham prices down.

“I know, I know,” Hallveck said. “But I love that so much for Easter. I’d consider it, but Thanksgiving is turkey.&rdquo

The price of frozen turkeys is up slightly as well. The U.S. Department of Agriculture says frozen hens average $1.08 a pound in early November, compared to 89 cents a pound a year ago.

The USDA, Centers for Disease Control and the Minnesota Department of Health have all repeatedly stated that people should not worry about getting sick from eating turkey. The risk to humans is extremely low.

And many of the turkeys that will be on Thanksgiving tables this year were already slaughtered and frozen before the outbreak.

Click here for current information on meat prices on the USDA’s website.


Summer Bird Flu Outbreak Won’t Affect Your Thanksgiving Turkey

PHILADELPHIA (CBS ) — With Thanksgiving right around the corner, consumers may be wondering if the turkey supply will be affected by this summer’s bird flu outbreak.

The outbreak destroyed eight percent of the nation’s turkey supply, according to Rachel Cloninger, Assistant Vice President of Poultry at PennAg Industries Association. She says Pennsylvania was not affected and supply is healthy, with more than 8.5 million turkeys raised in the state every year.

“Our industry is strong. We do rank 10th nationally in turkey production,” Cloninger says. “We have quite the scope to handle our production for the Thanksgiving holiday.

She says birds can be shipped to areas that were hit hard by the bird flu, and since supplies are strong, there should be no shortages and no price hikes.


Turkey Supply, Prices Hit Hard By Avian Flu Outbreak

CHICAGO (CBS) — The avian influenza outbreak has created a turkey shortage at sandwich shops and meat markets across Chicago.

A sign at a Jimmy Johns sandwich shop in the Loop informed customers that it has simply run out. They weren’t serving the popluar “Turkey Tom” sandwich.

Store managers admit the shortage, caused after the “bird flu” killed millions of turkeys, could continue.

On the Jimmy John’s website, the company explains a nationwide outbreak of avian influenza, which wiped out 40 million turkeys and chickens, hit their supply chain especially hard.

The turkey shortage is also noticeable at butcher shops like Peoria Packing in the West Loop, especially for turkey breasts.

The turkey breasts there are small because farmers, desperate to get some kind of product to market, slaughtered younger, smaller turkeys.

Of course with the supply down, prices are up.

Turkey breast last month cost $1.90 a pound. Today, is $2.29. Next month’s estimate: $2.59.

Other turkey prices are also affected: Boxes of turkey burgers were $7.99 in June, now they’re $8.99.

Looking ahead to Thanksgiving, experts predict a 10 percent decrease in turkey production.

However, because the United States is exporting fewer turkeys this year, the domestic supply around the holiday should be adequate to keep prices at a normal level, or about $1.05 a pound for a holiday bird.


Cold storage

Meanwhile, some help for holiday feasts could come from cold storage, where stocks of whole turkey hens were at 98.7 million pounds as of the end of March, a 24 percent jump over February and up 16 percent over the same period a year earlier, according to federal Agriculture Department data.

Raising birds for Thanksgiving and Christmas meals begins early in the year, with turkeys slaughtered and stored in cold storage to meet the demand at year's end, say industry officials.

Some producers are confident that supplies will largely keep pace with demand.

"There is some wiggle room" for the holidays, said Darrell Glaser, who raises 600,000 turkeys a year for Cargill Inc at his family's Bar G Ranch in Rogers, Texas.

"You may see a small impact," said Glaser, who raises the variety of turkeys sold for Thanksgiving. "Unless this outbreak gets a lot worse, I don't see it having a huge impact on our overall supply."

Still, Glaser's not taking any chances. He has increased biosecurity measures on his farm and told staff not to get close to any wild birds. Visits to nearby farms have stopped, and any trips to the Midwest have been put on hold.


Thanksgiving turkeys likely limited because of bird flu

The largest-ever U.S. outbreak of avian influenza, which has devastated Midwestern poultry and egg producers in recent weeks, could be felt at Thanksgiving tables across the nation come November.

CHICAGO &mdash The largest-ever U.S. outbreak of avian influenza, which has devastated Midwestern poultry and egg producers in recent weeks, could be felt at Thanksgiving tables across the nation come November, farmers and some trade groups say.

The virulent H5N2 strain has already spread to 14 states and led to the deaths or scheduled euthanizations of more than 21 million birds, including 3.3 million turkeys in Minnesota, the nation&rsquos top turkey producer.

And now, with Thanksgiving just seven months away, farmers say they may be running out of time to raise enough turkeys -the traditional centerpiece of holiday feasts – to meet the demand.

Once a farm has been infected, flocks must be culled, composted in barns, then disposed of. Buildings must then be thoroughly disinfected. The whole process can take up to three months before a new flock of turkey poults can be brought in, said Steve Olson, executive director of the Minnesota Turkey Growers Association.

After chicks are re-introduced to the barns, farmers say, it typically takes about four months to produce a full-sized hen – the type of turkey most Americans prefer for their holiday feasts.

If breeder farms that supply the young birds have also been infected &mdash as some in Minnesota have &mdash simply acquiring the chicks could prove challenging.

And in Minnesota, there&rsquos still no sign of an end to the outbreak, despite tight biosecurity measures and quarantines. Already, at least one turkey processing plant has cut back on workers&rsquo shifts because of a lack of birds to slaughter.

&ldquoWe&rsquore going to have fewer turkeys coming out because of this,&rdquo Olson said.

&ldquoThe question we can&rsquot answer is how much this is going to impact our total system, because this isn&rsquot over yet,&rdquo he added.

Of the nearly 240 million turkeys raised last year in the United States, nearly one in five came from Minnesota farms. About 30 percent of the Minnesota birds are sold as whole turkeys at Thanksgiving and Christmas.

The remaining 70 percent are sold year-round for deli meat, frozen meals, ground turkey and other products, according to industry data.

&ldquoThere&rsquos a sense of pride in farmers, in what they do,&rdquo Olson said, in a state where farms have often been in the same family for generations. &ldquoThis is challenging their belief in their ability to raise turkeys, because they have not been able to stop the disease, despite them doing everything they can do from a biosecurity standpoint.&rdquo

RIPPLE EFFECTS

As the reach of the virus continues to expand, companies up and down the turkey supply chain are watching closely.

Tyson Foods Inc said on Monday that the avian influenza has affected some of its turkey contract farms in neighboring Iowa, where farmers have had to euthanize birds.

While that loss could affect production levels at its turkey plant sometime this summer, Tyson does not produce the whole turkeys typically used at Thanksgiving dinners. Its turkey division is a small part of the company&rsquos overall business, and Tyson does not expect the loss to have a material financial impact.

Food retailers are also monitoring the spread of the virus.

Boston Market Corp. said it has been assured by Butterball LLC, one of its main turkey suppliers, that the company&rsquos birds are being raised in areas not affected by the flu outbreak.

But Boston Market Chief Financial Officer Greg Uhing said the company is watching the situation. Butterball declined to discuss specific supply-chain arrangements it has in place with its customers.

Meanwhile, some help for holiday feasts could come from cold storage, where stocks of whole turkey hens were at 98.7 million pounds as of the end of March, a 24 percent jump over February and up 16 percent over the same period a year earlier, according to federal Agriculture Department data.

Raising birds for Thanksgiving and Christmas meals begins early in the year, with turkeys slaughtered and stored in cold storage to meet the demand at year&rsquos end, say industry officials.

Some producers are confident that supplies will largely keep pace with demand.

&ldquoThere is some wiggle room&rdquo for the holidays, said Darrell Glaser, who raises 600,000 turkeys a year for Cargill Inc at his family&rsquos Bar G Ranch in Rogers, Texas.

&ldquoYou may see a small impact,&rdquo said Glaser, who raises the variety of turkeys sold for Thanksgiving. &ldquoUnless this outbreak gets a lot worse, I don&rsquot see it having a huge impact on our overall supply.&rdquo

Still, Glaser&rsquos not taking any chances. He has increased biosecurity measures on his farm and told staff not to get close to any wild birds. Visits to nearby farms have stopped, and any trips to the Midwest have been put on hold.


Bird flu may take bite out of Thanksgiving’s turkey supply

(Reuters) – The largest-ever U.S. outbreak of avian influenza, which has devastated Midwestern poultry and egg producers in recent weeks, could be felt at Thanksgiving tables across the nation come November, farmers and some trade groups say.

The virulent H5N2 strain has already spread to 14 states and led to the deaths or scheduled euthanizations of more than 21 million birds, including 3.3 million turkeys in Minnesota, the nation’s top turkey producer.

And now, with Thanksgiving just seven months away, farmers say they may be running out of time to raise enough turkeys -the traditional centerpiece of holiday feasts – to meet the demand.

Once a farm has been infected, flocks must be culled, composted in barns, then disposed of. Buildings must then be thoroughly disinfected. The whole process can take up to three months before a new flock of turkey poults can be brought in, said Steve Olson, executive director of the Minnesota Turkey Growers Association.

After chicks are re-introduced to the barns, farmers say, it typically takes about four months to produce a full-sized hen – the type of turkey most Americans prefer for their holiday feasts.

If breeder farms that supply the young birds have also been infected — as some in Minnesota have — simply acquiring the chicks could prove challenging.

And in Minnesota, there’s still no sign of an end to the outbreak, despite tight biosecurity measures and quarantines. Already, at least one turkey processing plant has cut back on workers’ shifts because of a lack of birds to slaughter.

“We’re going to have fewer turkeys coming out because of this,” Olson said.

“The question we can’t answer is how much this is going to impact our total system, because this isn’t over yet,” he added.

Of the nearly 240 million turkeys raised last year in the United States, nearly one in five came from Minnesota farms. About 30 percent of the Minnesota birds are sold as whole turkeys at Thanksgiving and Christmas.

The remaining 70 percent are sold year-round for deli meat, frozen meals, ground turkey and other products, according to industry data.

“There’s a sense of pride in farmers, in what they do,” Olson said, in a state where farms have often been in the same family for generations. “This is challenging their belief in their ability to raise turkeys, because they have not been able to stop the disease, despite them doing everything they can do from a biosecurity standpoint.”

As the reach of the virus continues to expand, companies up and down the turkey supply chain are watching closely.

Tyson Foods Inc said on Monday that the avian influenza has affected some of its turkeycontract farms in neighboring Iowa, where farmers have had to euthanize birds.

While that loss could affect production levels at its turkey plant sometime this summer, Tyson does not produce the whole turkeys typically used at Thanksgiving dinners. Its turkey division is a small part of the company’s overall business, and Tyson does not expect the loss to have a material financial impact.

Food retailers are also monitoring the spread of the virus.

Boston Market Corp. said it has been assured by Butterball LLC, one of its main turkeysuppliers, that the company’s birds are being raised in areas not affected by the flu outbreak.

But Boston Market Chief Financial Officer Greg Uhing said the company is watching the situation. Butterball declined to discuss specific supply-chain arrangements it has in place with its customers.

Meanwhile, some help for holiday feasts could come from cold storage, where stocks of wholeturkey hens were at 98.7 million pounds as of the end of March, a 24 percent jump over February and up 16 percent over the same period a year earlier, according to federal Agriculture Department data.

Raising birds for Thanksgiving and Christmas meals begins early in the year, with turkeys slaughtered and stored in cold storage to meet the demand at year’s end, say industry officials.

Some producers are confident that supplies will largely keep pace with demand.

“There is some wiggle room” for the holidays, said Darrell Glaser, who raises 600,000 turkeys a year for Cargill Inc at his family’s Bar G Ranch in Rogers, Texas.

“You may see a small impact,” said Glaser, who raises the variety of turkeys sold for Thanksgiving. “Unless this outbreak gets a lot worse, I don’t see it having a huge impact on our overall supply.”

Still, Glaser’s not taking any chances. He has increased biosecurity measures on his farm and told staff not to get close to any wild birds. Visits to nearby farms have stopped, and any trips to the Midwest have been put on hold.


Bird Flu May Take Bite Out Of Thanksgiving's Turkey Supply

CHICAGO (Reuters) - The largest-ever U.S. outbreak of avian influenza, which has devastated Midwestern poultry and egg producers in recent weeks, could be felt at Thanksgiving tables across the nation come November, farmers and some trade groups say.

The virulent H5N2 strain has already spread to 14 states and led to the deaths or scheduled euthanizations of more than 21 million birds, including 3.3 million turkeys in Minnesota, the nation's top turkey producer.

And now, with Thanksgiving just seven months away, farmers say they may be running out of time to raise enough turkeys -the traditional centerpiece of holiday feasts - to meet the demand.

Once a farm has been infected, flocks must be culled, composted in barns, then disposed of. Buildings must then be thoroughly disinfected. The whole process can take up to three months before a new flock of turkey poults can be brought in, said Steve Olson, executive director of the Minnesota Turkey Growers Association.

After chicks are re-introduced to the barns, farmers say, it typically takes about four months to produce a full-sized hen – the type of turkey most Americans prefer for their holiday feasts.

If breeder farms that supply the young birds have also been infected -- as some in Minnesota have -- simply acquiring the chicks could prove challenging.

And in Minnesota, there's still no sign of an end to the outbreak, despite tight biosecurity measures and quarantines. Already, at least one turkey processing plant has cut back on workers' shifts because of a lack of birds to slaughter.

"We're going to have fewer turkeys coming out because of this," Olson said.

"The question we can't answer is how much this is going to impact our total system, because this isn't over yet," he added.

Of the nearly 240 million turkeys raised last year in the United States, nearly one in five came from Minnesota farms. About 30 percent of the Minnesota birds are sold as whole turkeys at Thanksgiving and Christmas.

The remaining 70 percent are sold year-round for deli meat, frozen meals, ground turkey and other products, according to industry data.

"There's a sense of pride in farmers, in what they do," Olson said, in a state where farms have often been in the same family for generations. "This is challenging their belief in their ability to raise turkeys, because they have not been able to stop the disease, despite them doing everything they can do from a biosecurity standpoint."

As the reach of the virus continues to expand, companies up and down the turkey supply chain are watching closely.

Tyson Foods Inc said on Monday that the avian influenza has affected some of its turkey contract farms in neighboring Iowa, where farmers have had to euthanize birds.

While that loss could affect production levels at its turkey plant sometime this summer, Tyson does not produce the whole turkeys typically used at Thanksgiving dinners. Its turkey division is a small part of the company's overall business, and Tyson does not expect the loss to have a material financial impact.

Food retailers are also monitoring the spread of the virus.

Boston Market Corp. said it has been assured by Butterball LLC, one of its main turkey suppliers, that the company's birds are being raised in areas not affected by the flu outbreak.

But Boston Market Chief Financial Officer Greg Uhing said the company is watching the situation. Butterball declined to discuss specific supply-chain arrangements it has in place with its customers.

Meanwhile, some help for holiday feasts could come from cold storage, where stocks of whole turkey hens were at 98.7 million pounds as of the end of March, a 24 percent jump over February and up 16 percent over the same period a year earlier, according to federal Agriculture Department data.

Raising birds for Thanksgiving and Christmas meals begins early in the year, with turkeys slaughtered and stored in cold storage to meet the demand at year's end, say industry officials.

Some producers are confident that supplies will largely keep pace with demand.

"There is some wiggle room" for the holidays, said Darrell Glaser, who raises 600,000 turkeys a year for Cargill Inc at his family's Bar G Ranch in Rogers, Texas.

"You may see a small impact," said Glaser, who raises the variety of turkeys sold for Thanksgiving. "Unless this outbreak gets a lot worse, I don't see it having a huge impact on our overall supply."

Still, Glaser's not taking any chances. He has increased biosecurity measures on his farm and told staff not to get close to any wild birds. Visits to nearby farms have stopped, and any trips to the Midwest have been put on hold.


Huge bird flu outbreak could take a bite out of the Thanksgiving turkey supply

CHICAGO (Reuters) - The largest-ever U.S. outbreak of avian influenza, which has devastated Midwestern poultry and egg producers in recent weeks, could be felt at Thanksgiving tables across the nation come November, farmers and some trade groups say.

The virulent H5N2 strain has already spread to 14 states and led to the deaths or scheduled euthanizations of more than 21 million birds, including 3.3 million turkeys in Minnesota, the nation's top turkey producer.

And now, with Thanksgiving just seven months away, farmers say they may be running out of time to raise enough turkeys — the traditional centerpiece of holiday feasts — to meet the demand.

Once a farm has been infected, flocks must be culled, composted in barns, then disposed of. Buildings must then be thoroughly disinfected. The whole process can take up to three months before a new flock of turkey poults can be brought in, said Steve Olson, executive director of the Minnesota Turkey Growers Association.

After chicks are re-introduced to the barns, farmers say, it typically takes about four months to produce a full-sized hen — the type of turkey most Americans prefer for their holiday feasts.

If breeder farms that supply the young birds have also been infected — as some in Minnesota have — simply acquiring the chicks could prove challenging.

And in Minnesota, there's still no sign of an end to the outbreak, despite tight biosecurity measures and quarantines. Already, at least one turkey processing plant has cut back on workers' shifts because of a lack of birds to slaughter.

"We're going to have fewer turkeys coming out because of this," Olson said.

"The question we can't answer is how much this is going to impact our total system, because this isn't over yet," he added.

Of the nearly 240 million turkeys raised last year in the United States, nearly one in five came from Minnesota farms. About 30 percent of the Minnesota birds are sold as whole turkeys at Thanksgiving and Christmas.

The remaining 70 percent are sold year-round for deli meat, frozen meals, ground turkey and other products, according to industry data.

"There's a sense of pride in farmers, in what they do," Olson said, in a state where farms have often been in the same family for generations. "This is challenging their belief in their ability to raise turkeys, because they have not been able to stop the disease, despite them doing everything they can do from a biosecurity standpoint."

RIPPLE EFFECTS

As the reach of the virus continues to expand, companies up and down the turkey supply chain are watching closely.

Tyson Foods Inc said on Monday that the avian influenza has affected some of its turkey contract farms in neighboring Iowa, where farmers have had to euthanize birds.

While that loss could affect production levels at its turkey plant sometime this summer, Tyson does not produce the whole turkeys typically used at Thanksgiving dinners. Its turkey division is a small part of the company's overall business, and Tyson does not expect the loss to have a material financial impact.

Food retailers are also monitoring the spread of the virus.

Boston Market Corp. said it has been assured by Butterball LLC, one of its main turkey suppliers, that the company's birds are being raised in areas not affected by the flu outbreak.

But Boston Market Chief Financial Officer Greg Uhing said the company is watching the situation. Butterball declined to discuss specific supply-chain arrangements it has in place with its customers.

Meanwhile, some help for holiday feasts could come from cold storage, where stocks of whole turkey hens were at 98.7 million pounds as of the end of March, a 24 percent jump over February and up 16 percent over the same period a year earlier, according to federal Agriculture Department data.

Raising birds for Thanksgiving and Christmas meals begins early in the year, with turkeys slaughtered and stored in cold storage to meet the demand at year's end, say industry officials.

Some producers are confident that supplies will largely keep pace with demand.

"There is some wiggle room" for the holidays, said Darrell Glaser, who raises 600,000 turkeys a year for Cargill Inc at his family's Bar G Ranch in Rogers, Texas.

"You may see a small impact," said Glaser, who raises the variety of turkeys sold for Thanksgiving. "Unless this outbreak gets a lot worse, I don't see it having a huge impact on our overall supply."

Still, Glaser's not taking any chances. He has increased biosecurity measures on his farm and told staff not to get close to any wild birds. Visits to nearby farms have stopped, and any trips to the Midwest have been put on hold.


Bird flu may affect T-giving turkeys

Buy Photo

The rising cost of turkey prompted the Food Bank of Delaware to purchase the turkeys it gives out for Thanksgiving several months earlier than usual. (Photo: SUCHAT PEDERSON/THE NEWS JOURNAL) Buy Photo

This year's bird flu outbreak also is affecting the price of turkey meat, which previously had been expected to fall this year.

The bird flu has claimed about 7.75 million turkeys nationwide so far. About 238 million turkeys were raised in the U.S. last year.

"As late as March, the forecast was for a 7-percent increase in production this year and it was coming true, but you can't see disease coming," said Russell Whitman, a poultry analyst for Urner Barry. "Now through June 13, production is forecast to be up 0.73 percent and I would expect that number to be lowered even more in the coming weeks."

Urner Barry is quoting wholesale turkey breast meat at $4.70 on the spot wholesale market, a 60 percent increase from this year's low in late March.

"Breast meat reaches its peak between the end of August and the end of September, so I think the price increases will continue based on that," he said. "We're already at an all-time high since 1989 and it's only June."

While the impact on the national turkey flock hasn't impacted most restaurants in Delaware, it has raised concerns over whether the price may surge come Thanksgiving.

"There will be almost no incentive for your favorite retailer to put out an attractive promotion because they'll be so expensive," Whitman said. "I think what you'll see instead are a lot more hams promoted in the fall because there are plenty of fat hogs out there."

The rising cost of turkey prompted the Food Bank of Delaware to purchase the turkeys it gives out for Thanksgiving several months earlier than usual. This year, the nonprofit spent $90,000 to acquire roughly 5,700 birds.

"We usually like to wait until the end of summer because the prices tend to drop, but a lot of our vendors were telling us they might not have inventory come September," said operations director Trevor Turner.


Stores Anticipating Price Hike Following Bird Flu Outbreak

MINNEAPOLIS (WCCO) — With so many farms and turkeys affected by avian influenza, some grocery chains are wondering how shoppers will react.

Over the past few years, Machenthun’s in Waconia has added more and more turkey options. Turkey has essentially become one of the more popular buys in the store.

“Your beef and pork still sell the best, but we sell a lot of turkeys,” one employee said.

And so far shoppers haven’t been scared off by the avian flu outbreak that’s wiped out nearly four dozen Minnesota turkey farms.

“Actually, chicken and turkey sales are at an all-time high,” store manager Dale Rademachersaid.

The flu does not affect turkey meat.

And it’s known that as long as poultry is cooked thoroughly, consumers won’t have any problems.

But they could soon see a price change.

Generally, after an outbreak is reported in any type of meat, it takes about four to six weeks for prices to go up.

“I would say at this point we could anticipate it, but we have not seen that,” Rademacher said.

But Mackenthun’s and other grocers are making one adjustment.

April is typically when stores place their Thanksgiving orders so distributors can start planning.

As of now, Mackenthun’s is holding off.

“Believe it or not we order turkeys for Thanksgiving this time of year,” Rademacher said. “But we haven’t placed that order yet. We are waiting based on what the market is going to be and what pricing is going to be.”

Keep in mind there have also been a few reports of the flu in chicken flocks.

This particular flu does not spread as easily among chickens as it does with turkeys.

So prices there shouldn’t be affected much, at least not at this point.


Watch the video: Will Avian Flu Impact Thanksgiving Dinner?


Comments:

  1. Zulukinos

    I'm sorry, I can't help you, but I am sure that they will help you find the right solution. Do not despair.

  2. Byford

    the answer Excellent, bravo :)

  3. Mordrayans

    Interesting thing

  4. Simeon

    I am final, I am sorry, but it at all does not approach me. Who else, can help?

  5. Simson

    Great message, I like it :)



Write a message